Saturday, October 08, 2005

Curmudgeon in the Wry 307

Saturday, October 08, 2005---633 Words---Average reading time: 2-minutes, 12 seconds (time well spent)
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Rave: Becky Quick
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Hmmm: Why do the bartenders in a cowboy movie never give change?
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Rave: Elizabeth Taylor was never more beautiful than she was as Rebecca in 1952’s “Ivanhoe.”
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Quote: “A bore is a person who deprives you of solitude without providing you with company.”---John D. MacDonald in “The Turquoise Lament.”
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Rant: Did Ray Nagin have any comment about the pictures of school buses being used to evacuate people from Galveston?
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Hmmm: Before Albert Einstein’s time who did we reference complete imbeciles against?
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Rave: Michael Connelly’s “The Lincoln Lawyer” has rekindled my interest in the legal thriller. He may or may not have reinvented the genre…but he certainly has refreshed it to an amazing degree and sets a new standard for the category.
The Lincoln lawyer of the title is Mickey Haller…so named because his office is his Lincoln Towncar tricked out with fax, phone, internet, folding desk and files. Chauffeured by a former client working off his fee, Mickey does business while commuting between the numerous court houses in Los Angeles.
On the surface Mickey appears to be the stereotypical sleazy defense attorney. His two ex-wives and young daughter are still fond of him (wife number two is his case manager)…he does his share of pro bono work…and is fiercely honorable in his own way. So beneath the surface of the lawyer with bus bench advertising, whose clientele are hookers, drug dealers, scam artists and assorted LA lowlifes is a flawed and complex character.
This practice provides a decent living (he has a home “with a million dollar view and a million one mortgage”), but not what the esteemed law firm pull down.
His chance at the brass ring (the franchise client) turns up when a rich Beverly Hills real estate broker is pinched for attempted rape and murder. Mickey feels this may be an unusual client for him---an accused who is actually innocent. The fee is huge and the checks do not bounce.
Naturally the case swerves in different directions and Mickey is compelled to reevaluate the veracity of his profession and the viable aspects of the law itself.
“The Lincoln Lawyer” has plenty of deduction and suspense, compelling ethical dilemmas, characters with depth and texture and razor sharp dialogue.
Mr. Connelly draws precise portraits of the individuals and their motivations. Mickey’s audacious scheme drives a slide rule perfect plot that leads to a turbulent climactic encounter followed by a stupefying revelation.
“The Lincoln Lawyer” proves that crime novels can be art. It deserves the careful reading its plot demands.
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Didjaknow: Jayne Mansfield had a 160 IQ and played the violin.
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Idle thought: In case you were wondering, no, I am not particularly interested in how your Fantasy League team is doing.
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Truism: The farther you go, the more likely it is you left the coffee maker on.
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Truism II: People will collect anything.
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Truism III: A lot of people who have tattoos today will regret them tomorrow.
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Quote: “An alcoholic is someone who drinks as we do, and we don’t like him.”---Lawrence Block.
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Hmmm: Whatever happened to all those Rubic’s Cubes?
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Ever wonder: Whatever happened to Pong?
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Didjaknow: William Shakespeare coined the phrases: “Foregone conclusion” (“Othello”) and “Off with his head” from Richard III.
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Good advice: Never trust a man who owns his own pool cue or a woman who says she never wore a scrunchy.
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Hmmm: How come you never see anyone looting Barnes and Noble?
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If you can read this, thank a teacher. If you are reading it in English thank a Veteran.
That is all.
As you were.

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